Towson University holds dedication ceremony for Science Complex

By: Kayla Dubose, Contributing Writer
Photo by Macy Dowla/ The Towerlight

Towson University (TU) had a dedication ceremony for the new Science Complex on Friday, Oct. 1. The event included a ribbon-cutting ceremony as well as tours of the building.

The purpose of the new building is to conduct environmental research and develop solutions for relevant issues like climate change. TU President Kim Schatzel said it is a functional symbol of hope for students, future science leaders, and their progress to enhance the earth and scientific discovery.

The major features of the new building include 50 laboratories, 30 research laboratories, 50 classrooms, eight lecture halls, 10 collaborative student spaces, an outdoor classroom, rooftop greenhouse, and planetarium.  

“My favorite part of the building is the planetarium,” said David Vanko, Dean of Fisher College of Science and Mathematics. “It’s so beautiful. It’s so stunning.” 

According to Vanko, he has been working with a team of faculty, planners and designers since 2008 to develop the new Science Complex. They worked to get funding from the state and donors to complete the project and ensure the building had everything students want and need to fulfill their science program.  

The building features theater-style seating for presentations and events. The upgrade has encouraged community and collaboration among Towson students. Senior microbiology major Itohan Eromosele said that the presentation-style seating is her favorite thing in the building. 

“I think it’s the most beautiful thing here,” Eromosele said.  “During the day it’s just full of students.  That’s where most people stay.”   

Eromosele also gave a speech at the ceremony.  She expressed her gratitude to those at Towson who made the facility happen because she has the opportunity to research in the building before she graduates.  

Multiple people gushed about the beauty of the building and how it is complementary to the environment.  The Science Complex is attached to the Glen Aboriterum. 

Joel Moore, a geology professor at TU, appreciates the floor to ceiling windows in his upgraded classroom.  His class observes the stream in the Glen and he has included that in his teaching.  

“I teach a lot about water, streams, stormwater management, we’ve already been around and looked at the stormwater management features in the building,” Moore said. “It’s certainly more fun to teach in a new beautiful space, Smith was starting to get long in the tooth.”

There are some research spaces inside the building that need more construction through the next six to twelve months.  One large improvement for the STEM program at TU as a result of the Science Complex is the increased amount of collaborative spaces for research.  

“I’m very proud to be a science student and to be able to experience this building,” Eromosele said.

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